Being involved in the refit and subsequent regeneration of HMS Kent has represented one of the most challenging – and rewarding – periods of my career

Chief Petty Officer Philip Shields

And general machinery, messes and living quarters have all been cleaned, refreshed or overhauled.

The refit ended in July, since when the 180-plus crew have been conducting trials in home waters and shaking off the cobwebs of being alongside, before bringing their frigate into Portsmouth for the service of rededication, blessed by peerless autumn weather by the Solent.

“Being involved in the refit and subsequent regeneration of HMS Kent has represented one of the most challenging – and rewarding – periods of my career,” said marine engineer Chief Petty Officer Philip Shields.

“Seeing the journey from tired metal hull to a rejuvenated, re-purposed capable fighting unit ready to rejoin the fleet has been a privilege.”

At the other end of the spectrum is Engineering Technician Owen Pryce’s for whom Kent is his first ship.

“I have been made to feel really welcome and always felt like part of the team. The ship is not just where I work, it’s also where I live and it’s been great to be able to show HMS Kent off to my family today,” he said.

Deputy Logistics Officer Lieutenant Gavin Waring added: “As a logistician, people are often the focus of my role. Watching individual sailors come together and form a ship’s company with a single focus and breathing life into the ship through living, working and training together is definitely the Navy at its best.”

His observations were echoed by Commanding Officer Commander Andrew Brown who said everyone involved in the refit had pulled together to achieve the “truly incredible.”

 

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