Royal Navy divers are on standby at 10 minutes notice around the UK to deal with these things, so last night was very much business as usual for my team. They did an excellent job, responding quickly to the incident and ensuring smooth running of the operation to make sure the public were kept safe throughout..

Commander Del McKnight

The device was identified as a German SD 50kg bomb, a small armour-piercing bomb dropped from an aircraft.

The operation to make the device safe required the closure of Waterloo and Westminster Bridges for several hours. Westminster Underground Station was also closed temporarily, and river traffic was halted.

“Royal Navy divers are on standby at 10 minutes notice around the UK to deal with these things, so last night was very much business as usual for my team,” said Commander Del McKnight, Commanding Officer of the Royal Navy’s Fleet Diving Squadron.

“They did an excellent job, responding quickly to the incident and ensuring smooth running of the operation to make sure the public were kept safe throughout. This sort of ordnance, while old, does still present a serious threat which is why the Royal Navy is always ready to respond and dispose of them.”

The Royal Navy’s Southern Diving Group has two teams, one based in Plymouth and one in Portsmouth. The teams are made up of elite divers, who are experts in explosive ordnance disposal and also serve at high readiness to deploy across the globe in support of Royal Navy operations.

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