Duke of Edinburgh receives Royal’s salute at last public engagement

The Royal Marines have given the Duke of Edinburgh a Royal Salute as members of the Corps family marked his last official engagement.

His association with the Royal Marines dates back 64 years to June 2 1953, upon Prince Philip’s appointment as Captain General Royal Marines in succession to the late King George VI.

During that time, the Duke has carried out a large number of visits to the Royal Marines at home and overseas.

In the past year alone, he has spent time with the Corps in London, Portsmouth and Plymouth. The Captain General's Parade brings to a close the veteran royal’s official engagements, although he may choose to attend certain events, alongside The Queen, from time to time. 

The Parade also marked the finale of the 100 days Royal Marines 1664 Global Challenge.

Being on parade for the Captain General at his final parade is a very memorable occasion for everyone here today. It’s also a great day for the 1664 Challenge and especially for the two Royal Marines who have run the entire 1664 miles of this year’s challenge

Lieutenant Colonel Gary Green, The Corps Colonel

The challenge, named after the year in which the Corps was founded, has seen more than 1,500 Royal Marines and Army Commandos from around the United Kingdom, take part in ventures to to raise funds for The Royal Marines Charity.

The running challenge started in Plymouth on April 25 and teams joined two key runners to complete 16.64 miles each day, finished off 1,664 miles later with a final run into the grounds of Buckingham Palace.

In addition, Royal Marines from around the globe have participated in extreme events, including 34 miles swimming underwater. One company of Royal Marines lifted 21,000 tonnes, the weight of HMS Ocean and ran 10,000km over 20 days.

The Duke met representatives from the Royal Marines 1664 Global Challenge, including Corporals Will Gingell and Jamie Thompson, who have completed the entire 1,664 miles.

Prince Philip also spoke with Royal Marine veterans and cadets before receiving the 1664 Global Challenge Baton. The Parade concluded with a march past and three cheers for the Captain General.

“This is a fantastic and historical day for the Royal Marines,” said Lieutenant Colonel Gary Green, The Corps Colonel.

“Being on parade for the Captain General at his final parade is a very memorable occasion for everyone here today. It’s also a great day for the 1664 Challenge and especially for the two Royal Marines who have run the entire 1664 miles of this year’s challenge. A truly remarkable achievement in itself.”

Corporal Gingell added, “The first 50 days were the hardest and somedays it was difficult to get started but we were together and once we got back on the running, we pulled each other through.”

His colleague Corporal Thomson said,  “Its been a team effort from a lot of the Corps and we can not thank them enough for getting us here to Buckingham Palace and meeting the Captain General. Its been a ‘Hoofing Experience’ and a ‘Hoofing Day’.