It’s an exciting time to be involved in the upgrade of the Royal Navy’s minehunters and great to see the Royal Navy making best use of its undercover facilities for the Hunt class,

Barry Woolley, BAE

Now she’s back in the water, Quorn and the Crazy A (aged 28 and 30 respectively) have been lifted up, put on blocks and moved inside.

Each will receive Caterpillar engines to replace the aged Deltics, plus other new machinery, sensors, systems, new galleys, new propellers, improved chilled water plants (crucial for potential operations in the Gulf, where two Hunts are deployed) and overhauled mess decks. 

In all, each ship requires 9,000 maintenance jobs completing; the BAE engineers reckon the work will take 190,000 hours per ship – more than 21½ years’ work if carried out by a single person.

“It’s an exciting time to be involved in the upgrade of the Royal Navy’s minehunters and great to see the Royal Navy making best use of its undercover facilities for the Hunt class,” said BAE’s projects and operational performance director Barry Woolley.

“These ships are crucial to the mine counter-measures capability of the Royal Navy. We’ll continue to ensure these vital ships are available for the Royal Navy to use for years to come.”

HMNB Portsmouth

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