HMS Middleton shares expertise with Djibouti Navy

The crew of HMS Middleton shared their seafaring experience and knowledge with counterparts in Djibouti as the minehunter edged its way to the Gulf.

The Hunt-class ship is heading for Bahrain, where she’ll be based for the next three years as part of the Royal Navy’s permanent minehunting presence in the region.

The relatively limited range of minehunters and their ability to store food and supplies, means HMS Middleton has frequently put into ports on her 7,500-mile odyssey from her native Portsmouth.

The bridge team, led by Lieutenant Commander Maryla Ingham, Middleton’s commanding officer, her navigator Lieutenant Byron Linn and trainee young officer Sub Lt Adam Beesley, chatted through the art of coastal navigation with the Djiboutian Navy and Coastguard.

Djibouti has welcomed many Royal Navy ships over recent years and we were pleased to be able to work with local forces to continue the professional development of our sailors.

Lieutenant Commander Maryla Ingham RN

“The morning was really rewarding and it has been very interesting seeing how a different nation trains its forces,” said SLt Beesley.

“Navigational safety is the baseline for any maritime operation and I think we have all benefited from the experience.”

Able Seaman(Sea) Carl Seabourne and Steward Fitzbert Alleyne showed some of the first-aid techniques used to deal with casualties at sea while HMS Middleton’s marine engineers took time from their busy schedule to show technicians from the Djiboutian Coastguard the essential routines for servicing their powerful outboard engines as well as offering advice on regular maintenance.

Lt Cdr Ingham said: “Today’s engagement has been thoroughly rewarding and worthwhile for all sides.

“Djibouti has welcomed many Royal Navy ships over recent years and we were pleased to be able to work with local forces to continue the professional development of our sailors.”

Once in Bahrain HMS Middleton will be working with the international Combined Task Force 152 which is responsible for ensuring safe passage for all lawful seafarers in the Gulf.