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HMS Turbulent

HMS Turbulent

HMS Turbulent was decommissioned on the 14th July 2012, six months shy of three decades' service. This ended a distinguished career for the second oldest of the Royal Navy's Trafalgar Class submarines, having come to the end of her natural operational life. The submarine’s bell was rung for the last time, the decommissioning pennant lowered on board, a religious service staged and the band of HM Royal Marines from Commando Training Centre, Lympstone, played – all blessed with sunshine.

HMS Turbulent

HMS Turbulent was kept busy in her final years with a marathon east of Suez deployment in 2011, when the submarine spent 268 days away from home. The boat also provided Tomahawk cruise missile coverage in support of operations in Libya – although she was not called upon to strike, unlike her sister Triumph.

It will be around 18 months before the very last crew member leaves the boat as the process of removing equipment and making all systems safe is completed. The submarine will eventually go into 3 Basin awaiting dismantling – a process which is the subject of a public consultation process by the MOD. There she’ll join the boat which gave the Trafalgar-class its name; she paid off at the end of 2009. There remain five T-boats on active service, with the youngest, HMS Triumph, due to conduct patrols until 2022.

The entire class of T-boats is being replaced by the seven hunter-killers of the Astute-class submarines which are in the process of entering service.

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ABOUT THE UNIT

KEY STATISTICS


Pennant

S87

Displacement (Dived)

5,298Tonnes

Displacement (Surfaced)

4,740Tonnes

Complement

130Personnel

Length

85.4Metres

Beam

9.8Metres

Draught

9.5Metres

Top Speed

32Knots

Number of Officers

18

Launch Date

01/12/82

Commissioned Date

28/04/84

TAKE A LOOK

UNITS IN TIME


HMS Turbulent HISTORY

TRACK THE HISTORY OF SHIPS NAMED HMS Turbulent
  • The First Turbulent

    The first ship to bear the name Turbulent was a Confounder-class gun brig built by Tanner at Dartmouth and launched on 17 July 1805. The brig displaced some 181 tons with a crew of 50 and she was armed with 12 guns. The first Turbulent had a brief career which came to an end on 9 June 1808 when on escort duty back to Britain she was attacked and captured by the Danes. Turbulent bore the brunt of the attack saving many of the merchant ships in the convoy.

  • The Second Turbulent

    The second HMS Turbulent was a Talisman-class destroyer with a displacement of 1098 tons and a complement of 102 men. Armed with five 4.5-inch quick firing guns and four 21-inch torpedo tubes, she was designed to screen the Grand Fleet and launch torpedo attacks on the German High Seas Fleet. As part of the Grand Fleet she sailed to engage the High Seas Fleet off Jutland in May 1916. On the 31 May HMS Turbulent was sunk by a German Battle Cruiser resulting in the loss of 90 members of her ships company. As a result of this action Turbulent was awarded the battle honour "Jutland".

  • A Peaceful Career

    The third HMS Turbulent had a peaceful career. A destroyer of the S-class she was launched on 29 May 1919 and was able to move through the water at an impressive 36 knots. Slightly smaller than her predecessor at 1075 tons, she had a complement of 90 men and was eventually decommisioned in 1936.

  • Daring Patrols for the Fourth Turbulent

    The fourth HMS Turbulent was a Triton-class submarine launched on 12 May 1941 by Vickers Armstrong Ltd at Barrow in Furness. She displaced 1,090 tons and was armed with one 4-inch quick firing gun and eleven 21-inch torpedo tubes of which five were external to the pressure hull and could not be reloaded at sea. The submarine joined the fleet on 3 January 1942 and lived up to her name with a series of daring patrols in the Mediterranean during which she sank 52,000 tonnes of enemy shipping during 1942, and a further 14,000 tonnes in the first six weeks of 1943. Sadly, the fourth Turbulent did not survive the war and was sunk on 12 March 1943 during her 13th patrol. None of the 59 ship's company survived. Her Commanding Officer, Commander John Wallace Linton DSO, DSC, was awarded the Victoria Cross and the submarine was awarded the battle honour: Mediterranean 1942.

  • The Last Turbulent

    The fifth and so far last HMS Turbulent is a T-class hunter-killer nuclear powered submarine. She was built by VSEL at Barrow in Furness and launched in December 1982. Since commissioning in 1984 she has undertaken a number of patrols from the North Atlantic to the Far East.

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TAKE A LOOK

HMS Turbulent was kept busy in her final years with a marathon east of Suez deployment in 2011, when the submarine spent 268 days away from home. The boat also provided Tomahawk cruise missile coverage in support of operations in Libya – although she was not called upon to strike, unlike her sister Triumph.

It will be around 18 months before the very last crew member leaves the boat as the process of removing equipment and making all systems safe is completed. The submarine will eventually go into 3 Basin awaiting dismantling – a process which is the subject of a public consultation process by the MOD. There she’ll join the boat which gave the Trafalgar-class its name; she paid off at the end of 2009. There remain five T-boats on active service, with the youngest, HMS Triumph, due to conduct patrols until 2022.

The entire class of T-boats is being replaced by the seven hunter-killers of the Astute-class submarines which are in the process of entering service.