Both trials were hugely successful in a very crowded sea around the back of the Isle of Wight

Lt Cdr Mickey Rooney, HMS Westminster’s Weapon Engineer Officer (WEO)

Using forward and aft trackers, Seawolf can follow – and then destroy – a target the size of a cricket ball travelling at three times the speed of sound.

If the system were placed in the middle of London, it could track its target over the M25 and knock it out of the sky over the North Circular – and the whole action would last under 20 seconds.

The weapon system is designed to detonate close enough to a target to cause maximum damage, making it either explode or plunge out of the sky.

But thanks to the upgrade Seawolf has received in recent years – effectively doubling the weapon’s range – it’s become less of a ‘miss-ile’ and more of a ‘hit-ile’, wreaking immediate and total destruction.

Celebrating the success of the double take-down, Westminster’s weapon engineer officer Lt Cdr Mickey Rooney, whose department is responsible for Seawolf (as well as other weapons and sensors aboard) said all aboard enjoyed what was “effectively a £1m seaborne clay pigeon shoot – and the target lost.

“Both trials were hugely successful in a very crowded sea around the back of the Isle of Wight – we killed the pesky targets stone-cold dead.

“It’s the first time our commanding officer has used this ‘cheap missile system’ – he’s used to the ‘millionaire’s option’ of a Trident from his submarine days.”

With the Seawolf experiments done, Westminster is gearing up for a high-profile visit to London. She’s due to sail up the Thames on March 13 to berth next to WW2 veteran HMS Belfast.