The process supports the RN’s enduring ethos of ‘all of one company’ which has long underwritten the flexibility of the Naval Service and its ability to deal with the ever changing threat to security in the maritime environment.

Lieutenant Peter Davis

A further highlight for HMS Atherstone was the opportunity for her guns crews to practise their self-defence techniques when coming under attack from fast patrol craft simulated by seaboats.

Following the exercise the ships swapped personnel to learn about each other’s roles. Lieutenant Peter Davis, second in command of HMS Atherstone, said:

“The transfer of personnel of varied specialisations between ships at sea is a brilliant way to allow the cross-pollination of ideas and working practices.

“The process supports the RN’s enduring ethos of ‘all of one company’ which has long underwritten the flexibility of the Naval Service and its ability to deal with the ever changing threat to security in the maritime environment.”

Commander Gordon Ruddock, Commanding Officer of HMS Monmouth, has previously commanded HMS Atherstone through two Gulf tours. He said:

“As commanding officer you develop a great sense of pride and ownership over your ship, which is something that never leaves you.

"The UK’s mine counter measure vessels make a very important contribution to the coalition presence in the Gulf, and it has been particularly enjoyable working so closely with my old ship.“