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Q

Can women join the Royal Naval Reserve?

A

Yes they can. Currently women make up approximately 25 per cent of the RNR.

Q

Do I get paid for the time I work and train with the Royal Naval Reserves?

A

Yes you do. Pay rates vary according to your rank or rate.

Q

Do all members of the Royal Naval Reserve serve at sea?

A

No, but much will depend on the job role assigned to you. Many Reservists will work ashore, rather than at sea.

Q

How much time will I need to take off work to complete the Royal Naval Reserves recruiting process?

A

The Armed Forces Careers Offices will try to arrange many of the procedures on the same day.  Sometimes it’s not always feasible so we would suggest you plan on having to take two days off work.

Q

Can I be LGBT and serve in the Royal Navy and Royal Marines?

A

Yes. The Naval Service is interested in people with potential to do their job, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender.

Q

What support is provided for Naval Service personnel with families?

A

The Naval Service provides a wide range of support to families of serving personnel. These include; flexible/alternative working patterns (operational commitment permitting), statutory maternity and paternity provision, support from the Naval Families Federation, Naval Personal and Family Service and RM Welfare groups providing comprehensive social work, community and advice service to Naval Service personnel and their families. Many Naval and Royal Marine establishments provide crèche facilities for working parents.

Q

Can women join the Royal Navy?

A

Women can join the Royal Navy, Royal Navy Reserves, QARNNS and Royal Marines Band Service and serve in all branches; however female personnel are currently excluded from serving as Royal Marines Commandos. This Armed Forces (AF) policy is regularly reviewed.

Q

Why are women not allowed to serve in the Royal Marines?

A

There are a number of roles in the AF which are closed to women on grounds of medical or combat effectiveness/team cohesion. Those roles are; Royal Marines Commandos; the Household Cavalry and Royal Armoured Corps; the Infantry and Royal Air Force Regiment. However, we do have women who serve in the Royal Marines Band Service, and there are females who have passed the All Arms Commando Course. This allows them to serve in support of 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines. This legal exemption from discrimination law is regularly reviewed.

Q

What is the Royal Navy's ethos regarding Equality and Diversity?

A

Our ethos is inclusive; it welcomes and appreciates differences and we are committed to ensuring that every individual has equality of opportunity for employment, training and advancement based solely on merit, and that they can be themselves at work to achieve their full potential in an environment that is trusting and open.

Q

If Naval Service personnel are deployed on operations, what arrangements are in place for their children?

A

The Naval Service has an interest in helping sailors and marines balance the needs of their employment with their family life. However as sailors and marines, serving parents or carers must be available for deployment at any time and thus have a responsibility for ensuring that they have arrangements in place to care for their children or dependant adults should they need to be away. Advice and guidance for serving parents is available from Career Managers and Naval Service support networks. AF policies allow serving couples with dependant children to accommodate only one serving parent being deployed at any one time.

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