We would like to place Cookies on your computer to give you the best possible experience when you visit our website. If you are happy with the current Cookie settings and want to continue to use this website as normal, click 'OK'. You also have the option to change these settings, plus learn more about Cookies and how we use them. More information on Cookies.

OK
Change settings

Sign into my account

Forgot your username Forgot your password

Protecting our Nation's Interests

Skip to main content
  • Current Location

    Faslane

    12:26 GMT - 17 April 2014

    Exercise Joint Warrior

    Follow the story
  • Current Location

    The Gulf

    11:20 GMT - 17 April 2014

    East of Suez

    Follow the story
  • Current Location

    British Isles

    10:38 GMT - 17 April 2014

    Home Waters

    Follow the story
  • Current Location

    Mediterranean Sea

    14:04 GMT - 15 April 2014

    Mediterranean

    Follow the story
  • Current Location

    Indian Ocean

    11:15 GMT - 14 April 2014

    Search for MH370

    Follow the story
VIEW FLEET BY:

Latest News

Close
  • Top Breaking Stories

    • Also in the news

      Close

      VIEW BY VESSEL

        Name of vessel
        Show vessel on map > Close
        HMS Gleaner

        HMS Gleaner

        HMS Gleaner is the Royal Navy’s smallest commissioned vessel – but small does not mean insignificant. The survey motor launch is an advanced survey vessel, using multi beam and sidescan sonar to collect data on the nature of the sea bed and the depth of water.

        HMS Gleaner

        Gleaner – which carries the prefix Her Majesty’s Survey Motor Launch or HMSML – was built at Emsworth in Hampshire and launched on 18 October 1983.

        She was designed to carry out inshore survey work along the South Coast of England, but has since carried out surveys around the coast of the UK, as well as making visits to overseas ports.

        Gleaner is also believed to be the only Royal Navy ship to have paid a visit to Switzerland, having travelled up the Rhine for a visit to Basle in 1988.

        COMMANDING OFFICER

        Adam Coles

        Adam Coles
        RANK:
        Lieutenant Commander
        JOINED:
        2001
        SPECIALISATION:
        Hydrography
        PREVIOUS UNITS:
        HMS Argyll, RNAS Yeovilton, HMS Echo, HMNZS Resolution, HMNZS Canterbury, HMS Scott
        Military experience

        Born and educated in South West Cornwall, Adam joined Britannia Royal Naval College as a Sub Lieutenant in May 2001. His Fleet time experience was gained in HMS Somerset and HMS Dumbarton Castle before undertaking Junior Warfare Officer training.

        Appointed to HMS Argyll in 2003 as an Officer of the Watch he undertook several towed array patrols in the North Atlantic, culminating with a 6 month deployment to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Telic.

        After sub-specialising in Military Hydrographic Surveying, Meteorology and Oceanography in 2005, Adam completed an initial period as an Aviation Forecaster at RNAS Yeovilton before returning to sea as the Navigating Officer of HMS Echo in 2007. Adam navigated Echo from the UK to the Far East and enjoyed 12 months undertaking Military Data Gathering (MDG) in the South China Seas.

        An exchange appointment with the Royal New Zealand Navy followed in 2009 during which he served as both the Officer in Charge of the Operational Survey Unit and the Deployable Hydrographic Survey Unit. Embarking in both HMNZS Resolution and Canterbury Adam conducted both commercial and military surveys across New Zealand and the South Pacific. A career highlight was leading a Rapid Environment Assessment and Harbour Survey to reopen the commercially strategic Port of Lyttleton after the disastrous Christchurch earthquake in 2011.

        Leaving New Zealand in the summer of 2011, Adam returned to the UK to attend the HM Advanced Survey course where he gained a Post Graduate Diploma in Hydrography from the University of Plymouth. Appointed to HMS Scott in early 2012 as the Operations Officer, Adam undertook several challenging periods of MDG in the North Atlantic and Gulf of Oman.

        Recently promoted Lieutenant Commander, Adam assumed command of HMS Gleaner in November 2013.


        ABOUT THE UNIT

        KEY STATISTICS


        Pennant

        H86

        Displacement

        26tonnes

        Complement

        8personnel

        Length

        14.8Metres

        Beam

        4.7metres

        Draught

        1.6metres

        Top Speed

        14knots

        Launch Date

        18/10/83

        Commissioned date

        5/12/83

        HMS Gleaner

        Smallest Commisioned Vessel In The Royal Navy

        TAKE A LOOK

        UNITS IN TIME


        HMS Gleaner HISTORY

        TRACK THE HISTORY OF SHIPS NAMED HMS Gleaner
        • The First Gleaner

          The first Gleaner was a 154-ton survey ketch hired in 1808 and bought by the Admiralty the following year, ordered to be “fitted out as a float light for Thornton Ridge, to be registered as a survey vessel by the name of Gleaner and established with guns and men.”

        • The Second and Third Gleaners

          She was lost in 1814, and it was 24 years before the second Gleaner appeared in the form of a rebuilt and renamed 371-ton wooden paddle gunvessel, formerly the Gulnare of 1833. She was broken up at Deptford in 184 Five years later the 216-ton wooden screw gunboat Gleaner made her debut; she was sold 14 years later in Montevideo.

        • The Fourth Gleaner

          Gleaner number four was a torpedo gunboat of 735 tons, built at Sheerness in 1890 and sold 15 years later, while number five was the General Stothard, a 160-ton War Department tender renamed Gleaner in 1906 and sold in 1921.

        • The Penultimate Gleaner

          The penultimate Gleaner was a Halcyon-class minesweeper, built in 1937 and originally designated as a survey ship, but on the outbreak of hostilities she was undergoing conversion to a minesweeper in Plymouth and saw extensive service during World War 2, gaining four Battle Honours. The ship was paid off into reserve in September 1946, and was broken up four years later at Preston.

        Recruiting Now

        The featured jobs are available now

        More Info

        I'm Interested in:
        • Explore Opportunities Engineering Technician (Marine Engineering)
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Royal Marines Officer
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Engineering Technician (Marine Submariner)
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Royal Marines Commando
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Engineering Technician (Weapon Engineering)
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Naval Nurse (Qualified)
          More info
        • Explore Opportunities Engineering Technician (Weapons Submariner)
          More info