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        HMS Duncan

        HMS Duncan

        HMS Duncan, the sixth and final Type 45 destroyer entered service with the Royal Navy four months ahead of schedule as 2013 came to a close.

        She was the most complete at launch in October 2010 and was also the quickest from launch to delivery to her base port of Portsmouth. Thanks to the hard work of both her ship's company and industry since her arrival HMS Duncan is now ready to take up her duties, undertaking a programme of trials to prepare the ship and her crew for operational deployment.

        HMS Duncan returns to Scotstoun after trials

        During build, the majority of her first year was spent installing major equipment, such as a gas turbine, medium calibre gun, Sea Viper weapons silo, and connecting it all together with enough electrical cable to circle the M25 almost three times.

        The power and propulsion system which can produce enough electricity to power a small city.

        During 2012 the harbour and sea trials were undertaken, which were hugely successful and completed in record time.

        2013 saw the completion of the major compartments which were gradually handed over to the ship staff along with the engineering systems prior to the Delivery Voyage and arrival into Portsmouth, when HMS Duncan was handed over to the Commanding Officer and Ship’s Staff.

        She was involved in extensive combat system sea trials and training throughout 2013, to be ready to undertake operational tasking along with her sister ships around the globe.

        COMMANDING OFFICER

        James Stride

        James Stride
        RANK:
        Commander
        JOINED:
        1991
        SPECIALISATION:
        Warfare
        PREVIOUS UNITS:
        HMS Scott, HMS Exeter, HMS Gloucester
        Military experience

        Educated at King Edward VI School in Southampton, Commander Stride joined the Royal Navy in 1991 as a University Cadet and spent three years at Southampton University reading Oceanography and Physical Geography.

        Following professional training, he joined HMS Bicester as the Navigating Officer in 1996. He next completed Hydrographical and Meteorological training and was appointed in 1999 as a forecaster for the Portsmouth based Type 23 Frigate Squadron.

        After Frigate Navigating Officer’s Course he joined HMS Scott as the Navigating Officer and one of the Survey Managers – a rewarding 18 months followed conducting ocean surveying in the Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.

        Selected to be the Flag Lieutenant to the Commander-in-Chief Fleet / Commander-in-Chief Eastern Atlantic in 2002 he worked for Admiral Sir Jonathan Band for two busy years.

        Completing Principle Warfare Officers’ course in 2005, he joined HMS Exeter as initially the Gunnery Officer then subsequently as the Operations Officer. During his time on board, the ship conducted a number of operations and exercises in European and North African waters before deploying to the South Atlantic.

        Two years at the Permanent Joint Headquarters (PJHQ) followed where he undertook a number of appointments in the Operations Division including working for the Afghanistan Operational Team, a detachment to Helmand as the PJHQ Liaison Officer to 52 Infantry Brigade and a year as the Military Assistant to the Brigadier charged with the day-to-day running of overseas joint operations.

        Joining HMS Gloucester as the Executive Officer in 2009, he enjoyed a rewarding appointment including two deployments to the South Atlantic and decommissioning her in August 2011.

        After successfully completing Advanced Command and Staff Course he joined HMS Duncan in December 2012 as her first Commanding Officer.

        A Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society his other interests, when time allows, centre on maintaining fitness, getting on the water (he owns a variety of watercraft including a small yacht, some dinghies and a number of canoes) and generally being outdoors.


        LATEST NEWS

         

        TOP STORIES

        HMS Duncan sails from Portsmouth for first time
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        31 December 2013

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        HMS Duncan visits Dundee
        17 December 2013

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        HMS Duncan opens to public during first visit to Dundee
        06 December 2013

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        HMS Duncan makes first foreign visit
        HMS Duncan makes first foreign visit
        02 December 2013

        Britain’s newest warship, HMS Duncan, has made her first foreign...

        WEAPONS SYSTEM

        WEAPON SYSTEM

        TYPE 45 DESTROYER
        type 45 destroyer
        • 30mm Gun
          Medium Calibre gun system
          30mm Gun

        • 30mm Gun
          Medium Calibre gun system
          30mm Gun

        • 4.5Mk8 Gun
          medium calibre weapon system
          Mk8 4.5 Gun

          If you're looking for punch and firepower, then the 4.5in main gun, found on the forecastle of all the Royal Navy's frigates and destroyers, is the most obvious provider. Even in an age of missiles, there's still a need for a weapon to pulverise enemy positions and demoralise the foe - and the 4.5in gun has done so in the Falklands and Iraq. The gun can fire up to two dozen high explosive shells weighing more than 40kg (80lbs) at targets more than a dozen miles away - and nearly 18 miles if special extended-range shells are used. In various forms, the 4.5in has been the Navy's standard medium gun since before World War 2, embodied today by the Mk8 which has been in service since the early 1970s. There are two types of Mk8 used by the Fleet. The older Mod 0 (with its curved turret), which is gradually being replaced, and the angular Mod 1 (nicknamed Kryten after the robot on the sci-fi sitcom Red Dwarf) which is harder for enemy radar to pick up. The main purpose of the gun is Naval Gunfire Support – artillery bombardment of shore targets. In this role the gun is capable of firing the equivalent of a six-gun shore battery. The Mk8 can also be used effectively against surface targets at sea.

        • Lynx Mk8
          Helicopter weapons system
          Lynx Mk8

          The Lynx truly is a jack of all trades, capable to taking on enemy ships (with Sea Skua missiles), enemy submarines (with Sting Ray torpedoes or depth charges), and smaller surface targets courtesy of machine-gun pods or sniper rifles. It can carry a Royal Marines boarding team, who abseil rapidly down ropes on to ships below, and regularly conducts surveillance and reconnaissance missions using its dazzling array of sensors, cameras and recording equipment. The Lynx is the backbone of the Fleet Air Arm and front-line operations by the frigate and destroyer fleets, operating over the ice of Antarctica and the sands of the Gulf, the expanse of the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, the confines of the Strait of Gibraltar or English Channel

        • Phalanx
          Short range machine gun
          Short range machine gun

          Throwing up an impenetrable wall of fire, Phalanx is one of the deadly last lines of defence for Britain's warships. It is fitted to Type 42 and Type 45 destroyers and Bay, Wave and Fort Victoria-class ships in the RFA Capable of engaging targets around one mile away, Phalanx is a radar-controlled Gatling gun which fires 20mm shells, spewing out 3,000 rounds a minute. Like Goalkeeper, it is designed to engage incoming enemy aircraft and missiles if they penetrated a ship or task group's outer ring of defences such as Sea Viper or Sea Dart. During Operation Telic, Phalanx guns were removed from ships and were crewed by sailors defending Basra airport, the hub of British operations in southern Iraq. The guns saw extensive action against incoming rockets and mortars fired by insurgents.

        • Phalanx
          Short range machine gun
          Short range machine gun

          Throwing up an impenetrable wall of fire, Phalanx is one of the deadly last lines of defence for Britain's warships. It is fitted to Type 42 and Type 45 destroyers and Bay, Wave and Fort Victoria-class ships in the RFA Capable of engaging targets around one mile away, Phalanx is a radar-controlled Gatling gun which fires 20mm shells, spewing out 3,000 rounds a minute. Like Goalkeeper, it is designed to engage incoming enemy aircraft and missiles if they penetrated a ship or task group's outer ring of defences such as Sea Viper or Sea Dart. During Operation Telic, Phalanx guns were removed from ships and were crewed by sailors defending Basra airport, the hub of British operations in southern Iraq. The guns saw extensive action against incoming rockets and mortars fired by insurgents.

        • Sea Viper
          Surface to Air missile system
          Sea viper

          Sea Viper is the punch of the Type 45 destroyers, the very reason the ships exist - and the reason why that main mast is so tall. The missile provides all-round defence – not just for the destroyer but for an entire naval task group - against all aerial threats some 70 miles away. It races towards its target at speeds in excess of Mach Four (over 3,000mph) using a series of tiny jets to manoeuvre, carrying out sharp turns at G forces no human could endure. The system comprises Sampson radar (the spinning egg atop the Type 45’s main mast), a Combat Management System, long-range radar, the Sylver missile-launching system on the destroyer's forecastle and Aster 15 and Aster 30 missiles with ranges up to 20 and 75 miles respectively. Until January 28 2009 – the date of the arrival of the first Type 45, HMS Daring, in Portsmouth – Sea Viper was known as PAAMS: Principal Anti-Air Missile System. The missiles were tested at France's missile range, the Centre d’Essais de Lancement des Missiles on Île du Levant, off Toulon, using a special trials barge, Longbow, before the first successful firing from Type 45. That came off the Outer Hebrides in September 2010 at the Benbecula ranges, where HMS Dauntless successfully shot down a drone target.

        ABOUT THE UNIT

        KEY STATISTICS


        Pennant

        D37

        Displacement

        8,000tonnes

        Complement

        190personnel

        Length

        152Metres

        Beam

        21.2metres

        Draught

        5.3metres

        Top Speed

        30+knots

        Range (Nautical)

        7,000nautical miles

        Launch Date

        11/10/10

        Commissioned date

        to be decided

        Number of Compartments

        777

        TAKE A LOOK

        HMS Duncan

        UNITS IN TIME


        HMS Duncan HISTORY

        TRACK THE HISTORY OF SHIPS NAMED HMS Duncan
        • The First Duncan

          The First HMS Duncan was built at Bombay for the Honourable East India Company, but on completion was purchased for the Royal Navy and classed as a fifth rate 38-gun frigate. She saw service exclusively in the Indian Ocean countering French privateers. She was later renamed HMS Dover in 1807 and wrecked in a storm in 1811.

        • The Second HMS Duncan

          Was a 74-gun Vengeur-class, third rate ship of the line and was launched in December 1811 from Deptford. Her first war service was, as befitted her name, as part of the squadron blockading the Dutch coast in 1812 and she subsequently saw service in the Mediterranean and South America. In 1834 she was placed on harbour service until she was broken up in 1863.

        • The Third HMS Duncan

          This HMS Duncan was a 101-gun screw-propelled first rate ship of the line, displaced in excess of 2000 tons, with 100 guns on three gundecks and carried over 800 crew. The ship was launched in 1859 and saw service as the flagship of the North America and West Indies Squadron. In 1890 she was renamed as HMS Pembroke and employed on harbour service. She was renamed again in 1905 to HMS Tenedos and sold in 1910.

        • The Fourth Duncan

          This was the first of six Duncan class Pre-Dreadnought Battleships ordered in response to French and Russian building programs. Displacing 14000 tons, with four 12in guns and a maximum speed of 19 knots, they were for some years the fastest battleship afloat. HMS Duncan was commissioned at Chatham Dockyard in October 1903 for Mediterranean Fleet Service, although she would also serve in the Channel (1905) and Atlantic (1907) Fleets before returning to the Mediterranean in 1909.

        • World War I

          In August 1914 when the First World War began, the fourth HMS Duncan was still in a refit period. When she came into service she was employed in numerous missions including bombarding German submarine bases off the Belgium coast, guarding the UK against German invasions and aiding troops in landing at Athens. In March 1919 she was placed on the disposal list and sold for scrapping in February 1920.

        • The Fifth Duncan

          Duncan No.5 was a D-class Destroyer and was launched from Portsmouth Dockyard in July 1932. She was commissioned in April 1933 and because she was built as a Destroyer Leader, she displaced 25 tons more and carried 30 extra personnel than the rest of her class. Overall she displaced 1400 tons, had a main armament of four 4.7in guns and eight 21in torpedo tubes and a maximum speed of over 36 knots.

        • Far East

          HMS Duncan no 5 had an extensive career and started before World War II. She was part of the 1st Destroyer Flotilla and sailed to the Far East where she spent the next few years from January 1935 including being in Shanghai during the Japanese invasion of 1937, helping evacuate 1300 British civilians to Woosung.

        • World War II

          At the start of the World War II in September 1939, accompanied by Dainty, Diana and Daring no 5 was sent to the Mediterranean to conduct embargo operations. From 1942 to 1945, she was heavily involved in convoy duties and in 1943 she joined Escort Group B-7 as the Senior Officer’s ship. Overall HMS Duncan was involved in the sinking of 5 U-boats. On 13th May 1945 she was nominated for reduction to Reserve units and sold to be broken up for scrap in September 1945 at T W Ward’s Yard in Barrow.

        • Battle Honours

          Spartivento 1940 Malta Convoys 1941 Atlantic 1941-1945 Siego Suarez 1942

        • The Sixth HMS Duncan

          was a Type 14 or Blackwood Class Frigate launched in May 1957 and commissioned in October 1958. The ship served in the Cod Wars that was between the United Kingdom and Iceland over fishing rights, intervening between the Icelandic coastguard and British trawlers. HMS Duncan was given the Freedom of the city of Hull for her role she played in the Cod Wars. In August 1960 she was an escort to HMY Britannia and in 1964 she fired the salute at the opening of the Forth Road Bridge. Her ship visits included Nantes in 1961 and Copenhagen in 1965 and in total she clocked up over 197000 miles during her sea service. During the early 1980s, she served with HMS Eastbourne (F73) as a Harbour Training Ship at Rosyth Dockyard. This was for Marine Engineering Artificer Apprentices from the shore base HMS Caledonia. The ship ended her career by being decommissioned in 1984 and then broken up in February 1985.

        • The Seventh HMS Duncan

          She is a Type 45 destroyer and is the sixth and final ship in this class. She was ordered along with her sister ships in December 2000. Built by BAE Systems Surface Fleet, construction began with her being laid down on 26th January 2007. She was launched on 11 October 2010 in Govan and subsequently fitted out in Scotstoun.

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