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        HMS Defender

        HMS Defender

        HMS Defender is the fifth of the Navy’s six state-of-the-art Type 45 destroyers – Defender was built in Glasgow which is one of her two affiliated cities (the other is Exeter). After delivery to her home port of Portsmouth in July 2012 and acceptance into the Fleet in March 2013, she underwent extensive sea trials and training in order to undertake operational duties anywhere in the world when tasked.

        HMS Defender

        In November 2013, HMS Defender returned to Glasgow, her affiliated city for a three-day visit, opening to the public in the King George V dock and hosting organised tours for school children, Sea Cadets and university cadets.

        In December 2013, the destroyer sailed to northern Scotland to meet a Russian Naval task group that had anchored in the Moray Firth sheltering from bad weather. Sailing through high sea states and storm force winds the ship was fulfilling the role of the fleet ready escort, demonstrating her high readiness and the Royal Navy's commitment to the security of home waters. The two navies exchanged messages of goodwill on New year's Eve. Defender returned to her home base of Portsmouth after Christmas to prepare for future tasking.

        COMMANDING OFFICER

        Philip Nash

        Philip Nash
        RANK:
        Commander
        JOINED:
        1994
        SPECIALISATION:
        Warfare
        PREVIOUS UNITS:
        HMS Coventry, HMS Glasgow, HMS Nottingham, HMS Northumberland, HMS Grafton, HMS Daring
        Military experience

        Philip Nash was educated at Banbury Comprehensive School and read Physics at Bristol University. After a year travelling and working around the world, including a short period working for a London firm of patent agents, he joined the Royal Navy in 1994 as a Fleet Air Arm Observer. After initial training at BRNC Dartmouth, where he was awarded the Queen’s Binoculars on passing out in 1995, he completed the Basic Observer Course in the Jetstream T2 and Gazelle aircraft at RNAS Culdrose. Selected to specialise as a Lynx Observer, he went on to complete Advanced and Operational Flying training in the Lynx Mk3 helicopter at RNAS Portland in 1997.

        His initial appointments at sea were as the Lynx Mk3 Flight Observer in HMS Coventry, on operations in the Adriatic and on ARMILLA Patrol in the Gulf, and thereafter to HMS Glasgow as Flight Commander. Deployed to the Far East, South Pacific and Australasia for most of 1999 to participate in Five Powers Defence Arrangement (FPDA) exercises, Glasgow was engaged on operations during that time as part of the United Nations force assisting East Timor with transition to democratic independence. On return to the UK, and after a short spell on the HQ staff of 815 Naval Air Squadron, he served at sea again as Flight Commander, this time in HMS Nottingham, deploying to the Gulf in the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks of 2001 and in 2002 returned to the Far East and Australasia on FPDA duties.

        Having qualified for bridge watchkeeping duties whilst serving in HMS Nottingham he completed the Principal Warfare Officer course at HMS Dryad in 2003 and served thereafter as an Above Water Warfare specialist in HMS Northumberland. Duties as Operations Officer in HMS Grafton followed, deploying twice more to the Gulf, first on OPERATION TELIC, ensuring the security of key Iraqi infrastructure in the Northern Arabian Gulf, and a year later as part of the MARSTRIKE 05 Task Group. After a period as a staff officer ashore in the Naval Command HQ in Portsmouth in 2006-7, dealing with the generation of frigates and destroyers for operations, he was selected to serve as Executive Officer and Second in Command of HMS Daring. His appointment in this First of Class ship spanned emergence from build in Glasgow, through acceptance trials and commissioning, to completion of Basic Operational Sea Training. In his last appointment prior to assuming command of HMS Defender he completed the Advanced Command and Staff Course at the Joint Services Staff College, Shrivenham, gaining a Masters degree in Defence Studies.

        Philip Nash is married, has 2 children and lives in Portsmouth.


        LATEST NEWS

         

        TOP STORIES

        HMS Defender proves herself ready to fight and win!
        19 March 2014

        HMS Defender has flexed her considerable muscle in the final...

        Eyes right
        Eyes right
        18 March 2014

        The men and women of HMS Defender march through their...

        Freedom of the City honour for HMS Defender
        13 March 2014

        Members of HMS Defender’s ship’s company will exercise their Freedom...

        Destroyer meets Russian Task Force along UK coastline
        09 January 2014

        HMS Defender has returned to Portsmouth today after ensuring a...

        WEAPONS SYSTEM

        WEAPONS SYSTEM

        TYPE 45 DESTROYER
        Type 45 Destroyer
        • 30mm Gun
          Medium Calibre gun system
          30mm Gun

        • 30mm Gun
          Medium Calibre gun system
          30mm Gun

        • 4.5Mk8 Gun
          medium calibre weapon system
          Mk8 4.5 Gun

          If you're looking for punch and firepower, then the 4.5in main gun, found on the forecastle of all the Royal Navy's frigates and destroyers, is the most obvious provider. Even in an age of missiles, there's still a need for a weapon to pulverise enemy positions and demoralise the foe - and the 4.5in gun has done so in the Falklands and Iraq. The gun can fire up to two dozen high explosive shells weighing more than 40kg (80lbs) at targets more than a dozen miles away - and nearly 18 miles if special extended-range shells are used. In various forms, the 4.5in has been the Navy's standard medium gun since before World War 2, embodied today by the Mk8 which has been in service since the early 1970s. There are two types of Mk8 used by the Fleet. The older Mod 0 (with its curved turret), which is gradually being replaced, and the angular Mod 1 (nicknamed Kryten after the robot on the sci-fi sitcom Red Dwarf) which is harder for enemy radar to pick up. The main purpose of the gun is Naval Gunfire Support – artillery bombardment of shore targets. In this role the gun is capable of firing the equivalent of a six-gun shore battery. The Mk8 can also be used effectively against surface targets at sea.

        • Lynx Mk8
          Helicopter weapons system
          Lynx Mk8

          The Lynx truly is a jack of all trades, capable to taking on enemy ships (with Sea Skua missiles), enemy submarines (with Sting Ray torpedoes or depth charges), and smaller surface targets courtesy of machine-gun pods or sniper rifles. It can carry a Royal Marines boarding team, who abseil rapidly down ropes on to ships below, and regularly conducts surveillance and reconnaissance missions using its dazzling array of sensors, cameras and recording equipment. The Lynx is the backbone of the Fleet Air Arm and front-line operations by the frigate and destroyer fleets, operating over the ice of Antarctica and the sands of the Gulf, the expanse of the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, the confines of the Strait of Gibraltar or English Channel

        • Phalanx
          Short range machine gun
          Short range machine gun

          Throwing up an impenetrable wall of fire, Phalanx is one of the deadly last lines of defence for Britain's warships. It is fitted to Type 42 and Type 45 destroyers and Bay, Wave and Fort Victoria-class ships in the RFA Capable of engaging targets around one mile away, Phalanx is a radar-controlled Gatling gun which fires 20mm shells, spewing out 3,000 rounds a minute. Like Goalkeeper, it is designed to engage incoming enemy aircraft and missiles if they penetrated a ship or task group's outer ring of defences such as Sea Viper or Sea Dart. During Operation Telic, Phalanx guns were removed from ships and were crewed by sailors defending Basra airport, the hub of British operations in southern Iraq. The guns saw extensive action against incoming rockets and mortars fired by insurgents.

        • Phalanx
          Short range machine gun
          Short range machine gun

          Throwing up an impenetrable wall of fire, Phalanx is one of the deadly last lines of defence for Britain's warships. It is fitted to Type 42 and Type 45 destroyers and Bay, Wave and Fort Victoria-class ships in the RFA Capable of engaging targets around one mile away, Phalanx is a radar-controlled Gatling gun which fires 20mm shells, spewing out 3,000 rounds a minute. Like Goalkeeper, it is designed to engage incoming enemy aircraft and missiles if they penetrated a ship or task group's outer ring of defences such as Sea Viper or Sea Dart. During Operation Telic, Phalanx guns were removed from ships and were crewed by sailors defending Basra airport, the hub of British operations in southern Iraq. The guns saw extensive action against incoming rockets and mortars fired by insurgents.

        • Sea Viper
          Surface to Air missile system
          Sea viper

          Sea Viper is the punch of the Type 45 destroyers, the very reason the ships exist - and the reason why that main mast is so tall. The missile provides all-round defence – not just for the destroyer but for an entire naval task group - against all aerial threats some 70 miles away. It races towards its target at speeds in excess of Mach Four (over 3,000mph) using a series of tiny jets to manoeuvre, carrying out sharp turns at G forces no human could endure. The system comprises Sampson radar (the spinning egg atop the Type 45’s main mast), a Combat Management System, long-range radar, the Sylver missile-launching system on the destroyer's forecastle and Aster 15 and Aster 30 missiles with ranges up to 20 and 75 miles respectively. Until January 28 2009 – the date of the arrival of the first Type 45, HMS Daring, in Portsmouth – Sea Viper was known as PAAMS: Principal Anti-Air Missile System. The missiles were tested at France's missile range, the Centre d’Essais de Lancement des Missiles on Île du Levant, off Toulon, using a special trials barge, Longbow, before the first successful firing from Type 45. That came off the Outer Hebrides in September 2010 at the Benbecula ranges, where HMS Dauntless successfully shot down a drone target.

        ABOUT THE UNIT

        KEY STATISTICS


        Pennant

        D36

        Displacement

        8,000tonnes

        Complement

        190personnel

        Length

        152Metres

        Beam

        21.2metres

        Draught

        5.3metres

        Top Speed

        30+knots

        Range (Nautical)

        7,000nautical miles

        Launch Date

        21/10/09

        Commissioning date

        21/03/13

        Telephones Aboard

        404

        TAKE A LOOK

        HMS Defender

        UNITS IN TIME


        HMS Defender HISTORY

        TRACK THE HISTORY OF SHIPS NAMED HMS Defender
        • HMS Defender

          There have been seven previous ships of this name. The first was a 12-gun brig that was disposed of in 1802 during the Peace of Amiens

        • 1804

          Only two years later, the second HMS Defender was a 14-gun brig launched in 1804 and wrecked in 1809.

        • 1809

          The third Defender was a captured French privateer, previously the Beau Marseille. Captured by HMS Royalist, she was sold in 1814.

        • Colonial torpedo boat

          The fourth Defender was a second class colonial torpedo boat, and can still be seen on display at the Torpedo Boat Museum in Lyttleton, New Zealand.

        • Battle History

          The next HMS Defender was commissioned in 1911, a destroyer which saw extensive action throughout World War 1 before being sold in 1921.

        • Battle Honours

          Heligoland 1914

        • Battle Honours

          Dogger Bank 1915

        • Battle Honours

          Jutland 1916 - Damaged by a German shell but was able to carry out sufficient repairs to return to base in Aberdeen with HMS Onslow in tow, an act for which her captain, Lieutenant Commander L R Palmer, received the Distinguished Service Order.

        • The Fifth Defender

          The fifth Defender was an Inter-War destroyer which deployed in the Mediterranean during WW2, taking part in the clashes at Spartivento and the great night-time victory off Cape Matapan. She was lost off Egypt in 1941 when bombed by the Germans on a convoy run to Tobruk.

        • Battle History

          Calabria 1940 Spartivento 1940

        • Battle History

          After a brief spell as a shore establishment in Liverpool during the later stages of the Battle of the Atlantic, the Defender name returned to the high seas in the form of a 1950 Daring-class destroyer which found the wreck of the Prince of Wales off Malaysia, supported operations at Suez in 1956, and took part in both the Coronation Review of 1953 and celebrations surrounding the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969. She ended her days as a target ship.

        • The latest Defender

          The current HMS Defender is the fifth Type 45 Desetroyer. She was launched in 2009 and is expected to enter service in 2013.

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